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Tuesday, October 17, 2017
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Jerry Wong is the chip leader at WSOP Main Event entering Sunday's Day 6
 

Gaelle Baumann was the last woman standing at the 2016 WSOP Main Event.

Gaelle Baumann was the last woman standing at the 2016 WSOP Main Event.

LAS VEGAS -- Day 5 of the 2016 Main Event is in the books and just 80 players remain from the 251 that started the day. Leading the pack is Jerry Wong, who held a good stack all day but took the chip lead in the last 30 minutes of the day when he eliminated Bryan Piccioli. Wong now sits with a stack of 11,555,000.

Jan Suchanek sits in second with 10,305,000. This will be Suchanek's 11th WSOP cash and he will be looking to translate his strong chip stack into his largest cash to date.

Kenny Hallaert is in third place and has built a stack steadily throughout the day, knocking out former Main Event champion Greg Raymer along the way. Hallaert now sits with 10,050,000.

In fourth place is Griffin Benger, who is sitting on 9,860,000. Benger took the lead early in the day when his flopped Broadway straight held up against a turned straight and gutshot straight flush draw. Benger managed to stay among the top five stacks for much of the day and will be hoping to carry this upward momentum through tomorrow.

Joshua Weiss rounds out the top five with 8,330,000. Weiss rose to the top early in the day and though he dipped a little, he had a strong last level to bring him into the top five at the close of play at the Rio All-Suite Casino & Hotel.

The last woman standing was Gaelle Baumann, ultimately eliminated in 102nd place. For the second time in five years Baumann has managed to be the last woman to cash in the Main Event. In 2012 she narrowly missed the November Nine after being eliminated in 10th place

Another player repeating a deep run is Marc-Andre Ladouceur, who came 13th in the Main Event in 2012 (the same year as Baumann) and was eliminated in 139th place today.

Two players left in the field are still in the hunt to catch two-time 2016 bracelet winner Jason Mercier in this year's Player of the Year race. Paul Volpe (7,290,000) and Max Silver (3,545,000) can still catch Mercier to claim the title. Volpe would need at least a 3rd place finish and Silver would need to win in order to usurp Mercier from the top spot.

Two-time bracelet winner Cliff Josephy is still looking for a Main Event title. Josephy started the day with 1,554,000 and although he was short for a period, eventually finished the day with 6,175,000. Another recognizable tournament player left in the field is Tom Marchese, who now has his sixth cash of the summer. Marchese will be looking to add to his already impressive amount of tournament earnings with an even deeper run in the Main Event this year.

Antoine Saout has a shot at becoming only the second player ever to reach the November Nine twice. He finished up the day with 6,705,000 and will be hoping to improve on his success in the 2009 Main Event, where he finished third.

There will be no repeat champions this year as the remaining former Main Event winners were eliminated. First, 1987/88 winner Johnny Chan couldn't recover after his stack was crippled and finished in 180th. Later in the day, 2004 champion Greg Raymer busted in 122nd place when his pocket nines couldn't beat Kenny Hallaert's pocket tens.

Players will return at noon on Sunday and are currently scheduled to play five more two-hour levels. The minimum payout that the players are guaranteed upon their return is $80,721.

(Article courtesy of World Series of Poker)

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